RE-EXAMINING THE EVIDENCE

This updated and revised publication from The Institute for Research and Evaluation fairly explains and evaluates the most current data regarding the efficacy of Comprehensive Sexuality Education as currently being taught in our public schools. 

This is a very long paper, but we recommend that you read it -- even if all you can do today is skim to the conclusion on page 23, which basically states that Comprehensive Sexuality Education (now mandated by California lawmakers) has been ineffective in reducing teen pregnancy and disease, and that abstinence education appears to be more promising.

So, although our districts have no choice but to implement the CHYA, they are still allowed to create their own curriculum -- hopefully, one that places more emphasis on abstinence education as that seems to have a better chance at producing the healthiest outcomes.

To read the entire paper, please tap  HERE.

To read the entire paper, please tap HERE.

Why Teach Teens to Wait?

We teach our children why they shouldn't smoke, why they shouldn't do drugs, why they shouldn't drink, and why they shouldn't text and drive.  Why?  Because these behaviors carry great risk.  But when it comes to sex, there seems to be great hostility toward anyone who suggests that we teach our youth to wait.  We're not quite sure why this is.  But, if responsible adults don't teach our youth the risks associated with teen sex, who will?  

The folks at weascend.org clearly explain why Sexual Risk Avoidance education is a far superior approach to sex education than the Sexual Risk Reduction model of Teen Talk and all other curricula currently approved by the California Department of Education.


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Teens Feel Pressured to Have Sex

One of our favorite resources for information on the Sexuality Risk Avoidance (SRA) approach to sexuality education is WeAscend.org.  This infographic they produced demonstrates one of the negative effects of a Sexuality Risk Reduction (SRR) approach, which is the approach taken by all of the curricula that currently appear on the ASHWG.org website (the site recommended by the California Department of Education to find curricula which have been reviewed and deemed to be CHYA compliant).

Click here to open or download PDF